Breathe

The view of our ranch www.theretreatatzion.com from the plane although beautiful was also looking like a long way down. My beautiful daughter Emily had chosen Sky Diving as a present for her 19th birthday and dad was along for the flight, fall , and float experience.

I quickly and instinctively chose deep breathing as a simple yet powerful relaxation technique to use pre-jump. It’s easy to learn, can be practiced almost anywhere, and provides a quick way to get your stress levels in check. Deep breathing is the cornerstone of many other relaxation practices such as Yoga, Meditation, and other self regulation tools we teach and use at The Retreat At Zion (RAZ).

Pre Jump

Breathing away the stress!!!!!!!!

Thank You        skydivezion

Creative Therapy

(RAZ) Recovery Through Art

Creative or Expressive Therapy

Expressive therapy, also known as the expressive therapies, expressive arts therapy or creative arts therapy, is the use of the creative arts as a form of therapy. Unlike traditional art expression, the process of creation is emphasized rather than the final product. Expressive therapy is predicated on the assumption that people can heal through use of imagination and the various forms of creative expression.

Art therapy is a mental health profession in which clients, facilitated by the art therapist, use art media, the creative process, and the resulting artwork to explore their feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem.

At The Retreat At Zion (RAZ) we are seeing miraculous healing and recovery
through art!!!!!!!!!
Kevin  Brough

G.R.Attitude

Eagle Crags - Backside

The Great Return Attitude (“Gratitude”)is the most powerful emotion there is for bringing what you desire into your life.

When you think about things, people and experiences you are grateful for, your awareness of the good in your life increases, and you feel good. What you focus on increases, so the more you feel good about all there is to be grateful for, the more good stuff shows up.

Starting today!

Make a list of all you have to be grateful for, and think about them if you ever start to worry about what you do not have.

If you can’t think of anything to be grateful for, hold your breathe for a minute or two.The answer will come!

Now do so once a day for this whole week. See the effect it has on what and how you see, hear, and feel each day.

Adversity

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Each person’s peace and happiness, both now and long term, may depend largely on his or her responses to the trials of life.

Adversity and trials come from different sources. (1)Trials may come as a result or consequence of a person’s own decisions and actions. These trials can be avoided through learning from mistakes and taking the right actions. (2)Other trials are simply a natural part of life and are not a result of any poor decisions and in fact may come at times when people are doing their best. For example, people may experience trials in times of sickness, uncertainty, or from the deaths of loved ones. (3)Adversity may sometimes come because of others’ poor choices, hurtful words, and actions.

How we face adversity will determine the long term outcome of such trials. When we ask questions like “Why does this have to happen to me? Why do I have to suffer this now? What have I done to deserve this?” These questions have the power to dominate our thoughts. Such questions can overtake our vision, absorb our energy, and deprive ourselves of the experiences and insights we need to learn and grow from trials and tribulation. Rather than responding in this way, people should consider asking questions such as, “What am I to do? What am I to learn from this experience? What am I to change? Whom am I to help? How can I remember my many blessings in times of trial?”

Different kinds of adversity require different responses. If a person’s trials come because of their own poor choices, he or she should (1) correct the behavior and humbly seek to learn from their mistakes. Remember weakness is not sin. Remorse should be resolved not turned into shame. People who are stricken with illness or other trials may simply need to be (2) patient, positive, and faithful. People who suffer because of others’ words or actions should (3) not take it personally and work toward forgiving those who have offended them, so that the negative energy of anger does not cause more damage than the original offense itself. Victims of abuse however should seek help immediately and set boundaries to prevent future abuse.